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    Jules Cheret, Théâtre de l’Opéra, Carnaval, 1894, Color lithograph, Galerie Michael.  Click to inquire.     Decadence, a term most closely associated with the pathological symptoms of Aestheticism, characterized the perceived immorality of the Victorian era. Now associating the term with indulgence ultimately recalls the slumber we are slowly emerging from after the holiday season. While Aesthetic artists' lavish bacchanale-inspired paintings perhaps did not mirror Christmas dinner with grandma, they nevertheless visually resemble the overwhelm-ness one may have felt over the break.     David Drebin, Girls Night Out, C-Print, Contessa Gallery.  Click to inquire.       Michael Chapman, The Firewatcher, Oil on canvas, Arcadia Contemporary.  Click to inquire.   Seen in Jules Cheret's Théâtre de l’Opéra, Carnaval, 1894, contemporary to Aestheticism, reflects the parties of its time.  In modern and contemporary art, decadent attributes can be found. Whether in LnS’s floral headpieces that recall Greco-Roman bacchanals, or in the contemporary photos by David Drebin in the inventory of Contessa Gallery, they ultimately reflect an indulgent feeling. In frenzied revelry whether feasting, shopping, vacationing, those decadent victorians-and their warnings- continually can be referenced in today’s modern world.   Sinuhe Vega Negrin, The Four Seasons from Artifacts Series, Oil painted fiberglass and synthetic flora sculpture on iron and wood pedestal, LnS Gallery. Click to inquire. Jonathan Seliger, Midnight Ride, 2017, Tasende Gallery.  Click to inquire.   Sinuhe Vega Negrin, The Four Seasons from Artifacts Series, Oil painted fiberglass and synthetic flora sculpture on iron and wood pedestal, LnS Gallery.  Click to inquire.
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